The Early History of Corby

Corby is a historic market town located in the English Midlands. Modern-day visitors will find a great selection of bars, restaurants and Corby hotels, belying a history with its roots in pre-historic Stone Age civilisation.

Recent archaeological digs in the area around Corby have uncovered a wealth of artefacts that date back as far as the Neolithic and Mesolithic Ages. In 1970, an excavation at nearby Cowthick unearthed a number of human remains, which have been dated as Bronze Age in origin.

Many of these early inhabitants were believed to have lived a nomadic lifestyle in the area; the first permanent settlers to Corby were in fact Danish invaders, who built a stronghold here in the 8th century. It is from these Scandinavian roots that Corby takes its name; ‘Kori’s By’ (or ‘Kori’s Settlement’), was the name the Danes gave to their town, and it was later recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as ‘Corbei’. The citizens of Corby still celebrate their ancient Danish roots, as can be seen from the naming of one of the town’s more recent housing estates – ‘Danesholme’.

Corby next appears in the history books in 1226, when Henry III granted rights to the town to celebrate two annual fairs. Later, in 1568, Elizabeth I visited the town. Legend has it that she came into danger while hunting in the nearby Rockingham Forest, and was rescued by citizens of the town. As a mark of her gratitude, she passed a charter that declared all citizens of Corby exempt from paying taxes, and even gave them the right to refuse military service! To celebrate the liberating charter, the people recognised Elizabeth with the Corby Pole Fair – a colourful festival, held in the town every twenty years.

To visit this historic town for yourself, you need only check in to any Corby hotel. With a wealth of historic buildings, monuments and museums, it’s a great destination for any cultural weekend break.


December 27, 2011 | Author: | Posted in Destinations

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